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September 12, 2006
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Chainmaille bracer by unreal-hunter Chainmaille bracer by unreal-hunter
Finally, I finished my bracer yesterday
the lower-border whas the toughest part, i think i should have used bigger ID rings^^;
i wore it to school today, and .....it caught eyes^^

stats:
1/4 inch ID
1,3 mm galv steel (i think)
weaves used: Eu 6/1 for the borders
Eu 4/1 for the body

the closing piece is consistent of multiple single rings with a small ring on top, the closure pin goes through them like a zipper, making a rather snug fit.
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:iconnikidaeve:
NikidaEve Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Very clean look! I love the "locket" (i only call it that cuz thats how rare I see it) i pinning for the clasp it makes it keep form sooooo nice ^_^
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:iconunreal-hunter:
unreal-hunter Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
yeas but it allows for 0 fattening of the wrist. so I can't wear it in the summer ^^;
(when moisture saturation causes flesh to expand just a smidgen >.<)
also, the galvanised steel oxided something fierce, the inside is black from reacting with my sweat and such.
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:iconnikidaeve:
NikidaEve Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
I can imagine because with the summer swelling, my rings I wear dont even like to give to get them on. Unfortnuately I noticed with galvanized its only water resistant to corrosion. Its beautiful if you wash and dry it right away, but the salt from the skins tarnish sooooo bad. I had a chainmaille necklace that I did a "laced" effect with the english 4-1 weave and wore it to a faire. Well sweating so bad in it, and it being a choker, did the same from the sweat. Its so sad because the material for the most part is so easy to work with!

Too bad there isnt a method to reverse the blackened effect. I wonder if clearcoating the links (Like a sealant to just spray onto the finished products) would help deter the effects longer so wearing them in like warm humid climates dont ruin them if their galvanized.
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:iconunreal-hunter:
unreal-hunter Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
yes indeed, that tarnishing is nearly impossible to remove (short from abrasive polishing) Galvanised has since been regarded by me as a redundant material for chainmaille. I skipped to stainless steel about a year after, and have only been using that ever since. Okay well not really only, I have used brass and copper in rings, and bronze scales during that time too ^^

clear coating would be an idea. but it has it's restrictions. save from dipping the finished piece in a clear laquor, there is no way to get it into all the nooks and crevacis chainmaille has. I see dalmation spotted chainmaille in the future ;)
and I'd fear the coating would rub off when worn. not so much if the rings are under tention, but free dangling?
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:iconnikidaeve:
NikidaEve Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
well its not a clear coat. theress a geniune industrial grade spray that gets in the pores of the steel since steel is a mixture of iron and something else (I DONT wanna say alumninum but it may be) so theres little pores in it we cant see. I wanted to investigate to save my old galvanized pieces but you are right, stainless and brass are the easiest to use since its less of a headache cuz you dont have to seal
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:iconunreal-hunter:
unreal-hunter Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
XD speaking of sealing, there is a copper pendant in my gallery that I gave to my (now) ex. that thing only tarnished slightly to a darker brown, but her skin was green at the end of the day XD.

hahaa, metals are my specialty (=engineer)
steel is actually a collective name of ANY iron based alloy.
most are predominantly iron, with traces of carbon in em for rigidity.
pass 2% carbon and you got cast-iron
We also throw in nickel, silicon and manganese. most of those are specialty alloys btw ;)

fun fact:
stainless steel is usually ANSI 304L, which contains 18% chromium and 9% nickel
(and no, people with nickel allergies generally do not feel that;) )
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:iconnikidaeve:
NikidaEve Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
I did tool an die for about 2 years so I vaguely remember some but it's awesome you know all that! It's so handy to know and I honestly wish I kept with it. The more I think the more I want to go to school again but I get my business ID this week so it's all tenatative on which direction I need to take. But I wish I knew more about the metals
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:iconunreal-hunter:
unreal-hunter Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
then you might wanna look into a metalcaster's forum. I learned tonnes once I joined alloyavenue [link]
Appart from what they already know and share, it's more-so about getting interested in things you don't know yet, and looking them up.
It's part of my job, so I have a handy book here with most of this information right besides me ^^ but google knows too ;)
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(1 Reply)
:iconsnowkniight:
snowkniight Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2010
Lol, that's exactly what I would expect from you :P
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:iconunreal-hunter:
unreal-hunter Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2010  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
well you've seen it before ;)
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